Thursday, June 28, 2018

[Paleontology • 2018] Ceratosaur Palaeobiology: New Insights on Evolution and Ecology of the Southern Rulers


 The hypothetical phylogenetic relationships of ceratosaurs based on current topologies. 
The main source is from Wang et al. (2016).

Hypothetical reconstruction of two abelisaurids showing the soft tissues on the head inferred from osteological morphology of the skull. On the top, Carnotaurus; on the bottom, PycnonemosaurusArt by Maurilio Oliveira. 

in Delcourt, 2018. 

Abstract
Ceratosaur theropods ruled the Southern Hemisphere until the end of the Late Cretaceous. However, their origin was earlier, during the Early Jurassic, a fact which allowed the group to reach great morphological diversity. The body plans of the two main branches (Noasauridae and new name Etrigansauria: Ceratosauridae + Abelisauridae) are quite different; nevertheless, they are sister taxa. Abelisaurids have lost the ability to grasp in the most derived taxa, but the reduced forelimb might have had some display function. The ontogenetic changes are well known in Limusaurus which lost all their teeth and probably changed the dietary preference at maturity. The results presented here suggest that abelisaurids had different soft tissues on the skull. These tissues might have been associated with evolution of a strong cervicocephalic complex and should have allowed derived taxa (e.g. Majungasaurus and Carnotaurus) to have low-displacement headbutting matches. The ability to live in different semi-arid environment plus high morphological disparity allowed the ceratosaurs to become an evolutionary success.


Figure 1 The hypothetical phylogenetic relationships of ceratosaurs based on current topologies. The main source is from Wang et al. (2016). The phylogenetic position of Chenanisaurus is from Longrich et al.(2016) and the Ligabueino, Austrocheirus, Majungasaurinae and Brachyrostra are from Filippi et al.(2011).

 Figure 4 Skin structures inferred for abelisaurids. Dorsal surface of the skull of (A) Rugops (MNN IGU1), (C) Carnotaurus (MACN-CH 894) and dorsal surface of the fused nasal of (B) Abelisaurus (MPCA 11908). Scales bar: 5 cm. 


Figure 6 Hypothetical reconstruction of two abelisaurids showing the soft tissues on the head inferred from osteological morphology of the skull. On the top, Carnotaurus; on the bottom, Pycnonemosaurus.
Art by Maurilio Oliveira.

Rafael Delcourt. 2018. Ceratosaur Palaeobiology: New Insights on Evolution and Ecology of the Southern Rulers. Scientific Reports. 8, 9730.  DOI:   10.1038/s41598-018-28154-x 

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