Monday, June 25, 2018

[Fungi • 2018] Lamprospora sylvatica (Pyronemataceae) • A New Bryophilous Ascomycete on Dicranum montanum


Lamprospora sylvatica Egertová & Eckstein

in Egertová,  Eckstein, Sochor & Vega, 2018.

Abstract

Lamprospora sylvatica is described as a new species based on finds from Ukraine, Slovakia, Germany and Norway. It is characterised by the combination of the following features: pinkish, orange to reddish-orange apothecia with a fimbriate margin, globose ascospores with more or less regular areolate ornamentation, infecting strong rhizoids of Dicranum montanum with an infectious structure consisting of a one-celled appressorium surrounded by a multi-layered cluster of thick-walled cells and haustorium within the rhizoids. The apothecia were always found on rotten wood, which is an unusual habitat for hosts of bryophilous Pezizales. The new species is compared to similar taxa morphologically and by means of DNA sequencing. In the phylogenetic analysis based on LSU and ITS regions, L. sylvatica forms a well-supported clade close to L. feurichiana (on Ceratodon purpureus), L. kristiansenii (also on C. purpureus) and L. campylopodis (on Campylopus spp.).

Keywords: Ascomycota, bryosymbiotic fungi, haustoria within rhizoids, Hainich National Park, Malá Fatra National Park, Fungi


FIGURE 1. Lamprospora sylvatica  (B Eckstein-43421). apothecia between shoots of Dicranum montanum.

Scale bar: b = 1 mm. Photo: J. Eckstein.

Lamprospora sylvatica Egertová & Eckstein, sp. nov.

Etymology:— The specific epithet reflects the occurrence in forests. 


Zuzana Egertová, Jan Eckstein,  Michal Sochor and Marcel Vega. 2018. Lamprospora sylvatica (Pyronemataceae), A New Bryophilous Ascomycete on Dicranum montanum. Phytotaxa.  357(1).1; 17–29. DOI:  10.11646/phytotaxa.357.1.2



[Herpetology • 2018] Lygosoma peninsulare & L. kinabatanganensis • On the Taxonomy of Lygosoma bampfyldei Bartlett, 1895 (Squamata: Scincidae) with Descriptions of New Species from Borneo and Peninsular Malaysia and the Resurrection of Lygosoma schneideri Werner, 1900


 Lygosoma peninsulare  
Grismer, Quah, Dzulkefly & Yambun, 2018


Abstract
A reassessment of the taxonomy of Lygosoma bampfyldei based on morphology and color pattern indicates that it is a species complex containing L. bampfyldei Bartlett, 1895 from the Rajang River, Sarawak and Croker Range, Sabah in East Malaysia; Lygosoma peninsulare sp. nov. from Bukit Larut, Perak and 13.5 km east of Jeli, Kelantan, Peninsular Malaysia; Lygosoma kinabatanganensis sp. nov. from the Kinabatangan District, Deramakot camp (=Deramakot Sabah Forestry Department), Sabah, East Malaysia; and L. schneideri Werner, 1900 from Djapura, Indragiri, Sumatra, Indonesia—resurrected herein from the synonymy of L. bampfyldei. The new taxonomy aligns itself well with a growing body of literature demonstrating that semi-fossorial and fossorial Sundaic skinks are more diverse than previously considered.

Keywords: Reptilia, Sundaland, skinks, systematics, new species






L. Lee Grismer, Evan S. H. Quah, Zaharil Dzulkefly and Paul Yambun. 2018. On the Taxonomy of Lygosoma bampfyldei Bartlett, 1895 (Squamata: Scincidae) with Descriptions of New Species from Borneo and Peninsular Malaysia and the Resurrection of Lygosoma schneideri Werner, 1900.   Zootaxa.  4438(3); 528–550. DOI:  10.11646/zootaxa.4438.3.6

[Botany • 2018] Sindora stipitata (Detarioideae, Leguminosae) • A New Species from Northeastern Thailand


Sindora stipitata Chatan & Promprom

in Promprom, Chatan & Saisaard, 2018
มะค่าแต้นครพนม  ||  DOI:  10.3897/phytokeys.100.25870 

Abstract
Sindora stipitata, a new species in the subfamily Detarioideae (Leguminosae), collected from Nakhon Phanom Province, Thailand, is described and illustrated. The new species is morphologically similar to S. leiocarpa but differs in its smaller stature (3–5 m high), 6-foliolate paripinnate leaves, falcate persistent stipules, presence of a petal auricle, absence of a petal claw, stipitate ovary and capitate stigma. A key to the Thailand and Malesia species of Sindora is provided.

Keywords: Sindora, Fabaceae, Nakhon Phanom Province, plant diversity, Thailand, taxonomy


Figure 1. Sindora stipitata Chatan & Promprom, sp. nov.  A habit and habitat B branches and inflorescences C branch with leaves and stipules D branch with fruits.

 Photographs of the type specimen by W. Chatan. 

Figure 2. Line drawing of Sindora stipitata Chatan & Promprom, sp. nov. A a branch with leaves and inflorescence B floral bud C floret D posterior sepal (abaxial side) E posterior sepal (adaxial side) F one of the remaining narrower sepal (abaxial side) G one of the remaining narrower sepal (adaxial side) H petal (adaxial side) I free staminode J fused stamen K pistil.
Illustration by W. Chatan (based on type specimen).

Taxonomy
Sindora stipitata Chatan & Promprom, sp. nov.

Diagnosis: Sindora stipitata is very similar to S. leiocarpa from Malesia, but it is easily distinguished by the following characters: a smaller stature (3-5 m high), 6-foliolate paripinnate leaves, falcate persistent stipules, presence of a petal auricle, absence of a petal claw, stipitate ovary and capitate stigma.

Distribution: The new species is a Thai endemic and is known from only the type locality in the Phulangka National Park, Ban Pheang District, Nakhon Phanom Province, North-eastern Thailand.

Ecology: This new species grows in open areas of dry deciduous forest at an elevation of 250–350 m.


Etymology: The specific epithet refers to its distinctly long ovary stipe. This character is one of many morphological characters that distinguishes the new species from its closely related species.

Vernacular name: Ma Kha Tae Nakhon Phanom - มะค่าแต้นครพนม, Mak Tae.


Preliminary conservation status: Sindora stipitata is known only from the type locality and its estimated extent of occurrence is less than 100 km2. The number of mature individuals was less than 1,000 and the occupied area is continuing to decline slightly. Therefore, it should be considered as “Critically Endangered” according to the IUCN criteria B1 (IUCN 2017).


 Wilawan Promprom, Wannachai Chatan and Peerapon Saisaard. 2018. Sindora stipitata (Detarioideae, Leguminosae), A New Species from Thailand. PhytoKeys. 100: 149-156.  DOI:  10.3897/phytokeys.100.25870

[Botany • 2018] Taxonomic Revision of the Genus Calendula (Asteraceae) in the Iberian Peninsula and the Balearic Islands


Calendula suffruticosa Vahl (1791)

in Gonçalves, Castro, Paiva, et al., 2018.

Abstract
A taxonomic revision of the genus Calendula is presented, based on an extensive analysis of its morphological variation, which allowed a re-evaluation of the species delimitations in the Iberian Peninsula and the Balearic Islands. Morphometric data based on field and herbarium material were gathered and analysed. Characters traditionally used to delimit taxa in the genus were re-evaluated, and the taxonomic value of new characters was explored. The variation between and within taxa was explored statistically. Morphological patterns were compared with chromosome numbers and genome size estimates. The results revealed that the achenes are particularly important to distinguish taxa, although, due to their variability, they should be used carefully. Four species are recognised in the area (C. arvensis, C. officinalis, C. tripterocarpa and C. suffruticosa), including nine subspecies of C. suffruticosa. Among these, two new subspecies (C. suffruticosa subsp. trialata and C. suffruticosa subsp. vejerensis) are described. Identification keys, descriptions, geographical distributions and conservation assessments are also provided for each taxon.

Keywords: Calenduleae, Compositae, Mediterranean, Portugal, Spain, systematic, Eudicots




Ana Carla Gonçalves, Sílvia Castro, Jorge Paiva, Conceição Santos and Paulo Silveira. 2018. Taxonomic Revision of the Genus Calendula (Asteraceae) in the Iberian Peninsula and the Balearic Islands. Phytotaxa. 352(1); 1–91. DOI:  10.11646/phytotaxa.352.1.1

Sunday, June 24, 2018

[Herpetology • 2018] Molecular Phylogeny and Diversification of Malagasy Bright-eyed Tree Frogs (Mantellidae: Boophis)



in Hutter, Lambert, Andriampenomanana, et al., 2018

Highlights
• We estimated the first multi-locus phylogeny of Boophis frogs.
• Found that the B. ulftunni group was nested within the B. majori group.
• We erect the new B. blommersae group, composed of small, brown stream breeding frogs.
• We illustrate examples of correlated and repeated evolution in coloration and ventral transparency.
Boophis diversified within the Eastern highland forests of Madagascar.
• Adaptation to these highland areas was important in their diversification.

Abstract
We investigate the molecular phylogeny of Boophis, a group of arboreal frogs from the Malagasy-Comoroan family Mantellidae. Based on newly acquired DNA sequences of five mitochondrial and five nuclear markers (7444 base pairs), we infer a phylogeny of Boophis with complete species-level taxon sampling. We reconstruct the phylogeny using Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood and estimate divergence dates for the major clades of the genus. The phylogenetic analyses together support the monophyly of the two subgenera (Sahona and Boophis), and provide strong support for most previously identified species groups, except that the B. ulftunni group is nested within the B. majori group. We also erect a new species group related to the B. mandraka group, the B. blommersae group, composed of small-sized, brown stream-breeding frogs previously included within the B. majori group. Finally, we use the resulting phylogeny to illustrate striking examples of repeated evolution of coloration and ventral transparency and address the biogeographic history and broad pattern of species diversification in the genus. Ancestral area reconstructions provide evidence that Boophis diversified within the Eastern highland forests of Madagascar, and we suggest that adaptation to these highland areas was important in their diversification.

Keywords: Amphibia; Anura; Biogeography; Dispersal; Madagascar; Phylogeny




Carl R. Hutter, Shea M. Lambert, Zo F. Andriampenomanana, Frank Glaw and Miguel Vences. 2018. Molecular Phylogeny and Diversification of Malagasy Bright-eyed Tree Frogs (Mantellidae: Boophis). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. In Press.  DOI: 10.1016/j.ympev.2018.05.027

Saturday, June 23, 2018

[Ornithology • 2017] On Temminck’s Tailless Ceylon Junglefowl, Gallus ecaudatus, and How Darwin denied their Existence


 Lithograph of Gallus ecaudatus, based on specimen RMNH. AVES.224888, by Jean-Gabriel Prêtre prepared c.1806 for an illustrated work in three volumes that Temminck intended to publish on pigeons and Galliformes.

in van Grouw, Dekkers & Rookmaaker, 2017.
Bull. B.O.C. 137(4) 

  Summary
Ceylon Junglefowl was described in 1807 by the Dutch ornithologist Coenraad Jacob Temminck. The specimens he examined were tailless (‘rumpless’) and therefore he named them Gallus ecaudatus. In 1831 the French naturalist René Primevère Lesson described a Ceylon Junglefowl with a tail as Gallus lafayetii (= lafayetii), apparently unaware of Temminck’s ecaudatus. Subsequently, ecaudatus and lafayetii were realised to be the same species, of which G. stanleyi and G. lineatus are junior synonyms. However, Charles Darwin tried to disprove the existence of wild tailless junglefowl on Ceylon in favour of his theory on the origin of the domestic chicken. 


‘The tailless cock inhabits the immense forests of the island of Ceylon’ (Temminck 1813: 268). 

 ‘… but this statement [tailless fowls are wild in Ceylon] … is uterly false’ (Darwin 1868: 259).


Figure 2. Lithograph of Gallus ecaudatus, based on specimen RMNH. AVES.224888, by Jean-Gabriel Prêtre prepared c.1806 for an illustrated work in three volumes that Temminck intended to publish on pigeons and Galliformes. Only the volume on pigeons was published, in 1808, and the two volumes on Galliformes never appeared due to a confict between Temminck and the French illustrator of the frst volume, Pauline Knip (Dickinson et al. 2010). Instead, Temminck later published Histoire naturelle générale des pigeons et des gallinacés in three volumes (1813–15) without any colour illustrations. The reference ‘Gall. v. 1. pl. Enl.’ in Temminck’s published catalogue (1807) refers to the frst of the two unpublished volumes on Galliformes, which would have been vol. 2 of the complete work (Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden)


Hein van Grouw, Wim Dekkers and Kees Rookmaaker. 2017. On Temminck’s Tailless Ceylon Junglefowl, and How Darwin denied their Existence. Bull. B.O.C. 137(4); 261-271



[Botany • 2017] Fimbristylis fusiformis (Cyperaceae) • Taxonomy and Phylogenetic Position of A New Species from Thailand


Fimbristylis fusiformis Wangwasit & D.A.Simpson

in Wangwasit, Muasya, Chantaranothai & Simpson, 2017.

Abstract:
Fimbristylis fusiformis, an unusual new species of Cyperaceae from Thailand, is described and illustrated. This taxon has a single terminal spikelet per culm with a semi-distichous glume arrangement, bisexual flowers that lack perianth parts, and pistil with persistent style whose base is slightly swollen and trigonous nutlets with pubescent ribs. Phylogenetic reconstruction using ITS sequence data places this taxon in Abildgaardieae and sister to the rest of Fimbristylis. The species has a conservation status of Least Concern (LC).

Keywords: Conservation Status; Fimbristylis; Phylogeny; Taxonomy



Fig. 2 Fimbristylis fusiformis Wangwasit & D.A.Simpson.
a. Plants in habitat; b. close-up of spikelet. — Photos by D.A. Simpson.

Fimbristylis fusiformis Wangwasit & D.A.Simpson, sp. nov.

Superficially similar to F. pauciflora R.Br. but distinguished by the glumes 6.5–8.5 mm long (vs 2.5–3 mm long in F. pauciflora), nutlets fusiform, fimbriate at apex and base, with 3 longitudinal costae (vs nutlets obovate and glabrous in F. pauciflora). — Type: K. Wangwasit 080927-17 (holo K; iso BK, KKU), Thailand, Ubon Ratchathani, Pha Taem National Park, 27 Sept. 2008.

Etymology. Named after the shape of the nutlets.


 K. Wangwasit, A.M. Muasya, P. Chantaranothai and D.A. Simpson. 2017. Taxonomy and Phylogenetic Position of Fimbristylis fusiformis, A New Species of Cyperaceae from Thailand.  Blumea - Biodiversity, Evolution and Biogeography of Plants. 62(1); 47-52.  DOI: 10.3767/000651917X695209
repository.naturalis.nl/document/645595


[Mollusca • 2017] Erhaia wangchuki Erhaia Davis & Kuo (Gastropoda, Rissooidea, Amnicolidae) also in Bhutan


Erhaia wangchuki
Gittenberger, Sherub & Stelbrink, 2017


Abstract
The occurrence of at least one species of Erhaia in Bhutan, viz. Erhaia wangchuki sp. n., is confirmed by DNA sequencing. A second unnamed species from Bhutan, that might be congeneric, is known from only a single shell. According to the molecular analysis, E. wangchuki is most closely related to a still undescribed Erhaia species from China. These two species together with E. jianouensis and Akiyoshia kobayashii, both also from China, form a well supported clade. Awaiting additional molecular data, the apparent inconsistency regarding Erhaia versus Akiyoshia is not dealt with here. The extant true sister species of E. wangchuki could be among the four SE Himalayan species from Bhutan and Nepal that are classified with Erhaia on the basis of conchological data only.

Keywords: ErhaiaAkiyoshia, 16S, taxonomy, distribution, Nepal, Bhutan

Figure 1. Erhaia wangchuki sp. n., sequenced paratype; scale bar 0.5 mm (photographs by B.S.); Bhutan, district Wangdue Phodrang, Gangchhu, 2883 m alt.; 27°26'N, 90°11'E; Jigme Wangchuk leg. 21.iii.2015.

Figure 1. Erhaia wangchuki sp. n., sequenced paratype; scale bar 0.5 mm (photographs by B.S.); Bhutan, district Wangdue Phodrang, Gangchhu, 2883 m alt.; 27°26'N, 90°11'E; Jigme Wangchuk leg. 21.iii.2015.
 Figures 5–7. The Gangzetem brooklet (5), with the watertank at the source (6), and the site where the brooklet crosses the road (7). Photographs by Damber Bdr Chhetri.

Systematics
Superfamilia Rissooidea Gray, 1847
Family Amnicolidae Tryon, 1863

Genus Erhaia Davis & Kuo, 1985

Type species: Erhaia daliensis Davis & Kuo,
in Davis, Kuo, Hoagland, Chen, Yang and Chen, 1985.

Erhaia wangchuki sp. n.

Etymology: wangchuki, after Jigme Wangchuk, who discovered these minute snails.
....


 Edmund Gittenberger, Sherub Sherub and Björn Stelbrink. 2017. Erhaia Davis & Kuo (Gastropoda, Rissooidea, Amnicolidae) also in Bhutan. ZooKeys. 679: 21-28.  DOI:  10.3897/zookeys.679.13326

Friday, June 22, 2018

[Botany • 2018] Chamaelirium viridiflorum (Melanthiaceae) • A New Species from Jiangxi, China


Chamaelirium viridiflorum L. Wang, Z.C. Liu & W.B. Liao

in Liu, Feng, Wang & Liao, 2018. 

Abstract

Chamaelirium viridiflorum (Melanthiaceae), a new species from southern Jiangxi, China, is described and illustrated. It is similar to C. koidzumiana in their ellipitic or ovate leaf blade and slender petiole, but differs by its zygomorphic flowers and unequal tepals. Besides Chamaelirium viridiflorum is also similar to C. shiwandashanensis in their actinomorphic flowers, but distinguished by its spatulate to obovate leaf blade, distinct petiole and 0.8–1.1 cm long tepals. This new species has an obvious feature that the color of tepals is still greenish at the end of the flowering period.

Keywords: China, Chamaelirium, Melanthiaceae, New species, Taxonomy, Monocots


FIGURE 3. Chamaelirium viridiflorum L. Wang, Z.C. Liu & W.B. Liao.
A & B, Habit; C & D, Blade; E & H, Spike; F, Flower, lateral view; G, Pistil and stamen; I, Capsule.


Chamaelirium viridiflorum L. Wang, Z.C. Liu & W.B. Liao, sp. nov. 

 Chamaelirium viridiflorum is most similar to C. shiwandashanensis, but differs by its distinctly petiolate leaves; greenish inflorescence rachis; and longer tepals (0.8–1.1 cm).

Etymology:— The specific epithet refers to the flowers of this new species that are green throughout the flowering period, differing from those of all other known species.
....



Zhong-Cheng Liu, Lu Feng, Lei Wang and Wen-Bo Liao. 2018. Chamaelirium viridiflorum (Melanthiaceae), A New Species from Jiangxi, China. Phytotaxa. 357(2); 126–132.  DOI:  10.11646/phytotaxa.357.2.5

[PaleoMammalogy • 2018] Junzi imperialis • New Genus of Extinct Holocene Gibbon associated with Humans in Imperial China


 Junzi imperialis
Turvey, Bruun, Ortiz, Hansford, Hu, Ding, Zhang & Chatterjee, 2018


Abstract
Although all extant apes are threatened with extinction, there is no evidence for human-caused extinctions of apes or other primates in postglacial continental ecosystems, despite intensive anthropogenic pressures associated with biodiversity loss for millennia in many regions. Here, we report a new, globally extinct genus and species of gibbon, Junzi imperialis, described from a partial cranium and mandible from a ~2200- to 2300-year-old tomb from Shaanxi, China. Junzi can be differentiated from extant hylobatid genera and the extinct Quaternary gibbon Bunopithecus by using univariate and multivariate analyses of craniodental morphometric data. Primates are poorly represented in the Chinese Quaternary fossil record, but historical accounts suggest that China may have contained an endemic ape radiation that has only recently disappeared.




 


Samuel T. Turvey, Kristoffer Bruun, Alejandra Ortiz, James Hansford, Songmei Hu, Yan Ding, Tianen Zhang and Helen J. Chatterjee. 2018. New Genus of Extinct Holocene Gibbon associated with Humans in Imperial China. Science. 360(6395); 1346-1349. DOI: 10.1126/science.aao4903

The noblewoman's ape
Human activities are causing extinctions across a wide array of taxa. Yet there has been no evidence of humans directly causing extinction among our relatives, the apes. Turvey et al. describe a species of gibbon found in a 2200- to 2300-year-old tomb ascribed to a Chinese noblewoman. This previously unknown species was likely widespread, may have persisted until the 18th century, and may be the first ape species to have perished as a direct result of human activities. This discovery may also indicate the existence of unrecognized primate diversity across Asia.

Vanished ape found in ancient Chinese tomb, giving clues to its disappearance  sciencemag.org/news/2018/06/vanished-ape-found-ancient-chinese-tomb-giving-clues-its-disappearance
Chinese grave reveals vanished gibbon genus  science.sciencemag.org/content/360/6395/1287
Ancient Royal Tomb Yields Strange New Ape Species  on.natgeo.com/2IadhQP via @NatGeo
Ancient Chinese tomb reveals previously unknown extinct species  fw.to/MiyAvFb

[Paleontology • 2018] Cicada Fossils (Cicadoidea: Tettigarctidae and Cicadidae) with A Review of the Named Fossilised Cicadidae


(4) Platypedia primigenia, nearly entire specimen, wings superimposed over ventro-lateral body, in Colorado University Museum of Natural History, USA. (5a) Tibicina gigantea holotype, dorsal, entire specimen, from Boulard & Riou (1989). (5b) Tibicina gigantea close-up of left forewing base, from Boulard & Riou (1989). (6) Tibicina haematodes, forewing, from Wagner (1967). (7) Tibicina sakalai, holotype, including counterpart, female, lateral, from Prokop & Boulard (2000).

(1) Graptopsaltria aff. nigrofuscata forewing; in National Museum of Nature and Science, Japan; NSM-PA12018; image courtesy Yasunari Shigeta. (4) Minyscapheus dominicanus, holotype, whole specimen in amber; in collection George Poinar; image courtesy George Poinar. (5) Miocenoprasia grasseti, holotype, ventral impression; in Riou collection, Musée de Paléontologie, La Voulte-sur-Rhône, France; image courtesy Bernard Riou.  (7) Dominicicada youngi, holotype, hatchling in amber; in collection George Poinar; image courtesy George Poinar.

(2) Tanna? sp. hindwing; in National Museum of Nature and Science, Japan; NSM-PA12017; image courtesy Yasunari Shigeta. (3) Auritibicen bihamatus forewing; in National Museum of Nature and Science, Japan; NSM-PA12045; image courtesy Yasunari Shigeta. (6) Yezoterpnosia nigricosta forewing; in National Museum of Nature and Science, Japan; NSM-PA12019; image courtesy Yasunari Shigeta. (8) Burmacicada protera, holotype, hatchling in amber; in collection George Poinar; image courtesy George Poinar.

in Moulds, 2018. 

Abstract
The Cicadoidea comprise two families, the Cicadidae and the Tettigarctidae. This paper evaluates the status and taxonomy of all named Cicadoidea fossils belonging to the Cicadidae. Shcherbakov (2009) has previously revised the Tettigarctidae. Two new genera are described, Camuracicada gen. n. and Paleopsalta gen. n., for Camuracicada aichhorni (Heer, 1853) comb. n. and Paleopsalta ungeri (Heer, 1853) comb. n. A lectotype is designated for Cicada emathion Heer, 1853.

          Cicada grandiosa Scudder, 1892 is transferred to Hadoa Moulds, 2015 as Hadoa grandiosa comb. n.; Oncotympana lapidescens J. Zhang, 1989 is transferred to Hyalessa China, 1925 as Hyalessa lapidescens comb. n.; Meimuna incasa J. Zhang, Sun & X. Zhang, 1994 and Meimuna miocenica J. Zhang & X. Zhang, 1990 are transferred to Cryptotympana Stål, 1861 as Cryptotympana incasa comb. n. and Cryptotympana miocenica comb. n.; Tibicen sp. aff. japonicus Kato, 1925 is transferred to Auritibicen as Auritibicen sp. aff. japonicus comb. n., and Terpnosia sp. aff. vacua Olivier, 1790 is transferred to Yezoterpnosia Matsumura, 1917 as Yezoterpnosia sp. aff. vacua comb. n. The generic placement of two other fossils is changed to reflect current classification, those species now being Auritibicen bihamatus (Motschulsky, 1861) and Yezoterpnosia nigricosta (Motschulsky, 1866).

         Two species, Davispia bearcreekensis Cooper, 1941 and Lithocicada perita Cockerell, 1906, are transferred from the subfamily Cicadinae to the Tibicininae, tribe Tibicinini. Cicadatra serresi (Meunier, 1915) is also transferred from the Cicadinae to the Cicadettinae because the Cicadatrini have recently been transferred from the Cicadinae to the Cicadettinae (Marshall et al. 2018).

         Miocenoprasia grasseti Boulard and Riou, 1999 is transferred from the tribe Prasiini to the Lamotialnini. Tymocicada gorbunovi Becker-Migdisova, 1954 is transferred from the Dundubiini to the Cryptotympanini; Paracicadetta oligocenica Boulard & Nel, 1990 is transferred from the Cicadettini to the Pagiphorini and Minyscapheus dominicanus Poinar et al., 2011 is assigned to the Taphurini. Names of species once considered to belong in Cicadidae, but now excluded, are listed with explanation.

Keywords: Hemiptera, Eocene, Cretaceous, Jurassic, Miocene, Oligocene, Paleocene, Quaternary, Pleistocene, Pliocene, Tertiary

PLATE 2. (1) Lyristes renei, holotype, from Riou (1995). (2) Auritibicen sp. aff. japonicus comb. n., in Osaka Museum of Natural History, image Shigehiko Shiyake. (3) Paracicadetta oligocenica, holotype, part and counterpart, from Boulard & Nel (1990). (4) Platypedia primigenia, nearly entire specimen, wings superimposed over ventro-lateral body, in Colorado University Museum of Natural History, USA; UCM 29658, not the type; image David Zelagin. (5a) Tibicina gigantea holotype, dorsal, entire specimen, from Boulard & Riou (1989). (5b) Tibicina gigantea close-up of left forewing base, from Boulard & Riou (1989). (6) Tibicina haematodes, forewing, from Wagner (1967). (7) Tibicina sakalai, holotype, including counterpart, female, lateral, from Prokop & Boulard (2000).

PLATE 3. (1) Graptopsaltria aff. nigrofuscata forewing; in National Museum of Nature and Science, Japan; NSM-PA12018; image courtesy Yasunari Shigeta. (2) Tanna? sp. hindwing; in National Museum of Nature and Science, Japan; NSM-PA12017; image courtesy Yasunari Shigeta. (3) Auritibicen bihamatus forewing; in National Museum of Nature and Science, Japan; NSM-PA12045; image courtesy Yasunari Shigeta. (4) Minyscapheus dominicanus, holotype, whole specimen in amber; in collection George Poinar; image courtesy George Poinar. (5) Miocenoprasia grasseti, holotype, ventral impression; in Riou collection, Musée de Paléontologie, La Voulte-sur-Rhône, France; image courtesy Bernard Riou. (6) Yezoterpnosia nigricosta forewing; in National Museum of Nature and Science, Japan; NSM-PA12019; image courtesy Yasunari Shigeta. (7) Dominicicada youngi, holotype, hatchling in amber; in collection George Poinar; image courtesy George Poinar. (8) Burmacicada protera, holotype, hatchling in amber; in collection George Poinar; image courtesy George Poinar.

M. S. Moulds. 2018. Cicada Fossils (Cicadoidea: Tettigarctidae and Cicadidae) with A Review of the Named Fossilised Cicadidae. Zootaxa.  4438(3); 443–470. DOI:  10.11646/zootaxa.4438.3.2



[Herpetology • 2018] Sphenomorphus yersini • A New Skink of the Genus Sphenomorphus Fitzinger, 1843 (Squamata: Scincidae) from Hon Ba Nature Reserve, southern Vietnam


Sphenomorphus yersini 
Nguyen, Nguyen, Nguyen, Orlov & Murphy, 2018

Yersin’s Forest Skink || DOI:  10.11646/zootaxa.4438.2.6

Abstract
A new forest skink of the genus Sphenomorphus Fitzinger, 1843 is described from Khanh Hoa Province, southern Vietnam based on morphological characters of four specimens and a fragment of 653 nucleotides of the gene COI. Sphenomorphus yersini sp. nov. is characterized by the following morphological characters: medium size in adults (snout-vent length up to 55 mm); tail length/snout-vent length ratio 1.81; toes reach to fingers when limbs adpressed; midbody scale rows 32–34, smooth; paravertebral scales 61–69; ventral scale rows 58–67; subcaudal scales 112; supraoculars four, rarely five; prefrontals in broad contact with one another; loreal scales two; tympanum deeply sunk; smooth lamellae beneath finger and toe IV 10–12 and 18–20 respectively; a pair of enlarged precloacal scales; hemipenis deeply forked and asymmetrical with two differently sized smooth lobes. The new species differs from its most similar congener, Sphenomorphus buenloicus Darevsky & Nguyen, 1983, by 16.4–16.7% uncorrected p-distance in COI sequences.

Keywords: Reptilia, COI gene, forest skink, Sphenomorphus buenloicus, Sphenomorphus yersini, asymmetrical hemipenis



Sphenomorphus yersini sp. nov.

Etymology. We name this new species in honor of the famous physician and bacteriologist, Alexandre Yersin (1863–1943), who discovered the bacterium responsible for bubonic plague. Hon Ba NR associates with the name of Alexandre Yersin who built a research station on the top of the mountain and worked there. Currently, the research station has been reconstructed and opened to visitors. We recommend Yersin’s Forest Skink as the common name of this new species.


Sang Ngoc Nguyen, Luan Thanh Nguyen, Vu Dang Hoang Nguyen, Nikolai L Orlov and Robert W. Murphy. 2018.  A New Skink of the Genus Sphenomorphus Fitzinger, 1843 (Squamata: Scincidae) from Hon Ba Nature Reserve, southern Vietnam. Zootaxa. 4438(2); 313–326. DOI:  10.11646/zootaxa.4438.2.6