Sunday, July 17, 2016

[Botany • 2014] Begonia chingipengii • A New Species (sect. Baryandra, Begoniaceae) from Luzon Island, Philippines


Begonia chingipengii R. Rubite

Abstract
Begonia chingipengii from Gabaldon, Nueva Ecija, Luzon Island is described as a new species endemic to the Philippines. This is the latest addition to the newly delimited Begonia section Baryandra. It resembles Begonia trichochila but is distinguished by the variegated leaves with light green veins and midrib contrasting with the dark green adaxial surface and maroon abaxial surface, and its oblique leaf is elongated with an acuminate apex. The robust variegated leaves, large flowers and extensive inflorescence make it very attractive.

Keywords: Begoniaceae, Baryandra, Begonia chingipengii


Ecology :— Disturbed broadleaf forest; on rocky slope above stream. PHILIPPINES. Luzon Island. Nueva Ecija

Etymology :— The plant is named in honor of Dr. Ching-I Peng, the leader of the expedition, collaborator, mentor and supporter of R. R. Rubite in the studies of Philippine begonias. 

FIGURE 2. Begonia chingipengii R. Rubite.
A, B, Habit and habitat; C, Cultivated plant at anthesis; E, Leaf abaxial surface; F, Inflorescence
 [A-F,  from Peng 23368 (HAST)] 

Discussion

This new species is the most recent addition to the newly delimited section Baryandra (Rubite et al. 2013; Nakamura et al. 2013), bringing the total in this section to 51. Begonia chingipengii resembles B. trichochila, but is distinguished by the variegated leaves with light green veins and mdirib contrasting with the dark green adaxial surface and maroon abaxial surface, while B. trichochila is all green. The oblique leaf is elongated into an acuminate apex, while that of B. trichochila is oblique but more rounded at the apex. The leaves, flowers and fruits of B. chingipengii are all larger (Table 1).

Like a number of other species of Begonia in the Philippines (e.g. B. blancii and B. suborbiculata, Hughes et al. 2011) and some species in southern China [e.g. B. leprosa Hance (1883: 202), Peng et al. 2010; B. peltatifolia H. L. Li (1944: 209) and B. pseudodryadis C. Y. Wu (1995: 276), Peng, unpublished data], the clustered stomata of B. chingipengii (Figure 4B) and B. trichochila (Figure 4E) are likely to be a way in which the species copes with periodical drought or fluctuating environment (see discussion in Gan et al. 2010; Hughes et al. 2011).

In the area where B. chingipengii was collected, only two small populations were seen. The following day the expedition group progress farther but failed to find any other population. This is the nature of Philippine begonias—they tend to be very narrowly endemic, characterized by small populations and are often confined to a particular locality.


Rosario Rivera Rubite, John Rey Callado, Yoshiko Kono and Hsun-An Yang. 2014. Begonia chingipengii (sect. Baryandra, Begoniaceae), A New Species from Luzon Island, Philippines. Phytotaxa. 164 (3): 175–182.  DOI 10.11646/phytotaxa.164.3.2
ResearchGate.net/publication/283142019_Begonia_chingipengii_sect_Baryandra_Begoniaceae_a_new_species_from_Luzon_Island_Philippines

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