Sunday, December 29, 2013

[Conservation / Ecology • 2013] Wildlife Conservation in Protected Areas in Thailand: Lessons from Chiew Larn, Khao Sok and Khlong Saeng


Figure 1. Rain forest covered islands in Chiew Larn reservoir (A–D) were originally inhabited by 12 species of small mammals. As a result of forest fragmentation, the area effect, and the invasion of a rat species not found in undisturbed forest, all native species went extinct locally in less than 25 years.

Chiew Larn Reservoir in southern Thailand was created in the forested interior of Khao Sok National Park and Khlong Saeng Wildlife Sanctuary in 1987. A study of small mammals isolated on the islands in the reservoir showed the near complete local extinction of the fauna in the 25 years after forest fragmentation. Wildlife conservation management and protected area policy implications of this study of fragmented forests are discussed as they will affect the next 50 years of Thai protected area management. 

Keywords: area effect, conservation, environmental policy, extinction, genetic erosion, habitat fragmentation, invasive species, mammals, protected areas, sustainability


DAVID S. WOODRUFF. 2013. Wildlife Conservation in Protected Areas in Thailand: Lessons from Chiew Larn, Khao Sok and Khlong Saeng. Nat. Hist. Bull. Siam Soc. 59(2): 91–107 

Luke Gibson, Antony J. Lynam, Corey J. A. Bradshaw, Fangliang He, David P. Bickford, David S. Woodruff, Sara Bumrungsri & William F. Laurance. 2013. Near-Complete Extinction of Native Small Mammal Fauna 25 Years After Forest Fragmentation. Science. 341 (6153): 1508-1510.  DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1240495
Ecological Armageddon

A.J. Lynam and I. Billick. 1999. Differential responses of small mammals to fragmentation in a Thailand tropical forest. Biological Conservation. 91 (2–3): 191–200.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0006-3207(99)00082-8

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